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Written by Neal Spelce

January 19, 2019

Volume 40, Number 40

To rent or to buy in the Austin area?  And where?  These are not only important decisions facing newcomersEven longtime residents have to weigh this decision during various stages of life.  A new report analyzed this question for several metropolitan areas in the USAnd, according to the national 2019 Rental Affordability Report, it is more affordable to rent than to buy in Travis, Williamson and Hays CountiesThis is true even as rents are rising, as well home prices.

The report calculated rental affordability as a percentage of wages to rent.  For housing affordability, it was calculated as a percentage of wages and the monthly cost of owning a 3-bedroom, median-priced home, based on a 3% down payment plus mortgage cost, property taxes, homeowner’s insurance and private mortgage insurance.  

In a separate study, rents in Austin ranked highest in the state.  In 2018, rent grew an average of $57 a month, or 4.4%, to yield an average monthly rent of $1,361, according to RentCafe.  So, even though rents are rising at a fast rate in the Austin area, it continues to be more affordable to rent than buy.

The flip side of the equation – home prices – is a major factor.  Even though Travis County home sales are declining, the median home price continues to rise.  In Williamson and Hays County, prices and sales are both rising (as many opt to leave Travis County.)

Rising interest rates, regulatory barriers, higher building material costs and labor shortages all contribute to the increasing cost of housing.  Not to mention, demand.

As long as the Austin area continues to be a magnet for newcomers (many from higher cost areas such as California), the demand for new homes will increase.  And some newbies opt to pay rent until they have time to become established in the area, before deciding where and when to buy a home.

Of course, as home prices rise, many potential homebuyers will be priced out of the market, making them renters.  Its a cycle that keeps repeating itself.  And, it looks like there is no immediate end in sight. Read more →

January 11, 2019

Volume 40, Number 39

Property values are increasing dramatically in highdemand, lowavailability parts of Austin.  Take the land west of the UTAustin campus where hot new development projects include highrise (and highdollar) luxury living units.  But, prime land is at a premium.  So, how do you meet strong demand?  An emerging trend is to build in air space above existing structures that are ideally located.  At the forefront of this trend is a church.  Thats right, a church.

You couldn’t ask for a much more ideal location for high rise student living units than in the 2000 block of Guadalupe Street (The Drag), alongside the UTAustin campus.  This is the location of St. Austins Catholic ParishSt. Austins is in active negotiation for air space development rights above its property.  This could be a big win-win for both parties.

Currently we are negotiating an exclusive agreement with Greystar, where we will spend the next couple of months developing the financial model that tells us if we could make a project work for all of us,” the pastor, Rev. Fr. Charles Kullman, told his parish.  The property is huge.  It not only includes the church facility itself but other buildings such as the rectory, offices, school, etc.

Greystar, he said, is a global leader in student housing with assets close to $30 billion.  “They stood out with their global experience and specific experience in West Campus, and it has the balance sheet needed to support a potential project of this size,” said Fr. Kullman.

Negotiations are not public, but the church will probably want to improve its existing facilities and negotiate ongoing payments from the development, while it maintains ownership and control of the land and church assets.  Greystar would, within existing city zoning regs, see how many living units (condos? rentals?) it can build and how high it can rise above the church facilities.

So, what’s the timetable?  “No decision to move forward will be made until everyone is comfortable with the financial model and it is approved by the Diocese,” said Fr. Kullman.  “I expect it would be sometime in late February before we get through this next step.”  St. Austins, by the way, tried to work a similar air space deal with UTAustin, but was told the universitys business model does not include student housing off their own property.  Also, we understand a small UTAustin fraternity, Acacia, is also working on an air space deal. Read more →

January 4, 2019

Volume 40, Number 38

As a New Year begins, most folks only look ahead and plan for the upcoming year.  But, economists are not most folks.”  Part of what they do is go out on a limb and look waaaaay out.  In the case of Texas economist Ray Perryman, would you believe 25 years between now and 2045?  Austins economy is strong now, and his longrange prediction for the next quartercentury is very positive for the Austin metro area.

Long range economic forecasts for the Austin area have not always been bullish.  Back when Austin was only a state-government-state-university town — modest economic growth was the standard.  In fact, going back to only 1980, a 25year forecast would have been grossly underestimated.

That was then.  This is now.  Here’s what Perryman said in the first days of 2019:  “The Austin-Round Rock metro area remains one of the top performers in the state and continues to attract national attention; the area is projected to be a strong performer over the forecast horizon.”

All that verbiage is well and good.  But what about numbers?  What will happen to the job situation?  “Nearly 665,100 new jobs are likely to be added by 2045,” Perryman predicted.  Whoa!  This is a whole lot of new jobs, new payrolls, new residents in the 5-county metro area.

When you break down his job numbers, you find it amounts to a 1.78% annual growth rate, spread out over the next 25 years.  Sure, the Austin metro has notched a higher annual growth rate than that in the past.  But, when you average the ups-and-downs certain to occur over a quarter-century, this is impressive.

In fact, Perryman’s predicted 1.78% job growth rate ties the DallasPlanoIrving Metropolitan Division and leads the others:  the Fort WorthArlington Metropolitan Division, 1.58% … El Paso metro, 1.5% … HoustonThe WoodlandsSugar Land metro, 1.64% … McAllenEdinburgMission metro, 1.64% … and San AntonioNew Braunfels, 1.66%.

Interestingly, about 72.4% of Texans live in these major metros.  And that percentage has been rising.  In fact, Perryman predicts through 2045, 80% of new jobs will be in the seven largest metro areas in Texas. Read more →

December 14, 2018

Volume 40, Number 37

As 2018 winds down, its time to look ahead to what can be expected in 2019 (especially since this is our final 2018 issue, as we take our traditional yearend 2week hiatus).  In no particular order, lets hit as many issues as we can cram into this weeks newsletter.  First, as you plan your 2019 travel, heres what you can expect at Austins airport.

Frequent flyers know record-breaking passenger traffic has crowded the corridors, security lines and parking at Austin-Bergstrom International Airport (ABIA) this year.  It is averaging a huge 15.1% increase over last year, with no additional airport capacity.  Hang on.  Help is on the way.  And sooner, rather than later.

Nine new gates are nearing completion.  They should be quite impressive.  They will open in phases in the next year.  The north facing gates are on track to open in the spring of 2019.  This is none too soon.  But final construction will continue on new restaurant space, concessions and for an area ABIA calls the patio.  All this and the south facing gates are set to open by fall of 2019.

Important, but not as sexy, the remodeling and modernization of 13 vestibules is entering into the final construction phase.  Vestibules are the automatic sliding glass entrances and exits.  They will be enlarged to allow more space to enter and exit the terminal with luggage, while controlling drafts and the loss of cooled air.

In 2019, look for a continued major increase in passenger traffic.  But, by the end of the year, the new construction should alleviate some of the hassle as you travel through ABIA. Read more →

December 7, 2018

Volume 40, Number 35

Its common these days for glowing national articles to be written about Austin.  So when an opinion piece in a respected national publication criticizes actions by Austin, you need to be aware of what is being said.  Within the past week, The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) wrote the City of Austin risks becoming the San Francisco of the South an expensive playground for wealthy progressives.”  And it cited examples.

 “It would be hard to find a better example of left-wing naiveite in municipal affairs than what transpired here in November,” wrote the WSJ in its opening sentence.  “Voters in the Lone Star State’s progressive bastion overwhelmingly approved a $925 billion bond package, but rejected a simple ballot initiative for an independent audit of city spending.”

“The defeat of the audit wouldn’t be so galling if the new bonds didn’t so obviously demonstrate the need for an independent review of Austin’s books.  Spending in the Texas capital is more like what one would expect in some profligate California city,” observed with WSJ.  “With this new bond package, Austin has been reduced to using debt to fund parks, public safety and sidewalk repair instead of paying for them out of its $4.1 billion annual budget.”

It cited other examples saying Austin “spends too much of its steadily growing budget on dubious social programs and utopian schemes, financed by a steadily growing tax burden.”  It ticked off actions such as mandatory paid sick leave “with an exemption, of course, for union shops.”  A solar-ready requirement for all new homes and commercial buildings was another example, as was “exorbitantly high development fees that get passed on to consumers.”

The priority of the citys ultraprogressive political establishment is to serve the interests of the wealthy, ultraprogressive white people who fund and elect Austins insular political class,” claims the WSJ opinion piece.  “As living here gets more expensive and as the city’s elite dig in to protect their left-wing haven from disruption and change,” it becomes more like San Francisco.  Tough talk.

Let’s put this in perspective.  Readers of the WSJ can agree or disagree with this assessment.  This is not the point.  The pointthis review of the City of Austins governing policies is now out there for all to see.  In a respected publication. Read more →

November 30, 2018

Volume 40, Number 35

Dear [MM_Member_Data name=’firstName’],

As we move into December its time to look ahead to 2019.  This is especially true when you single out real estate an essential portion of the Austin economy.  It also affects personally so many residents of the fastgrowing 5county Austin metro area.  So, what can you expect to happen next year?

The Urban Land Institute and PWC’s Emerging Trends in Real Estate:  2019 gives high marks to the Austin area and to Texas’ major metros.  In fact, Austin ranked #6 in the study, but it took a back seat to #1 Dallas/Fort Worth.  San Antonio ranked #20, while Houston ranked #37 in the review of the nation’s major markets.  These strong Texas cities have a significantly higher percentage of a younger population than the rest of the US.  This means there should be strong labor force growth and productivity.

As a result, demand for housing in these Texas markets is expected to remain strong through 2019,” Dillon Cook, founding partner and COO with Range Realty Advisors (RRA), told GlobeSt.com.  “Also Millennial demand for housing in these Texas markets is expected to continue for many years as a growing share get married, attain higher income levels and have children.”

There’s more to this positive real estate outlook than just demographics.  “Housing demand continues to be fueled by relatively low interest rates, low unemployment and continued economic growth,” Cook pointed out.  And Austin is among the nation’s leaders in these categories.

Yeah, but, what goes up must come down, right?  This may be true, but it’s all relative.  Range Realty Advisors points out “the ups and downs of economic cycles can vary substantially globally, regionally and by state.”  Cook says it is entirely possible the next nationwide economic downturn will look and feel very different in Texas compared to other states.

In previous economic downturns, there have been several causal factors – rampant speculative development for oneIn Austin most speculative real estate development is leased/sold as soon as its finished.  There are other national and international factors that are not currently apparent.  Conclusion:  “Add to this strong economic and job growth, high level of consumer confidence and business investment, and many believe Texas will continue to be a magnet for real estate investors and developers for years to come,” notes RRA. Read more →

November 23, 2018

Volume 40, Number 34

While enjoying leftovers from the Thanksgiving holiday weekend, its time to look ahead at a special Austin City Council runoff election that will likely be largely overlooked.  Even though Council positions are theoretically nonpartisan candidates are not listed by political affiliation Council District 8 has taken on an aggressively partisan Dem vs Repub tone.

It’s a special runoff election December 11, 2018 for three seats on the Austin City Council.  No candidate got 50+% of the vote November 6, 2018.  So the top two votegetters for District 1, District 3 and District 8 must face voters once again.  Here’s how it breaks down.

District 1 features newcomers Natasha HarperMadison against Mariana Salazar.  District 3 is a re-match of a family affair:  incumbent Pio Renteria is in the runoff with his sister, Susana Almanza.  Neither of these contests has partisan overtones.  No matter who is elected, these districts will continue to be represented by another leftleaning Council member.

The change in tone is for the District 8 Council seat.  You’ll recall this is the Council district currently represented by Ellen Troxclair.  An avowed conservative, Troxclair – who was frequently on the short end of 10-1 votes – decided not to seek re-election.

The runoff for this seat pits Paige Ellis against Frank Ward.  Why do we say this is a highly-partisan contest?  The Travis County Democratic Party endorsed Ellis.  And described the contest this way:  “Her opponent Frank Ward is a TrumpRepublican and former staffer for the Republican National Committee endorsed by outgoing conservative Council Member Ellen Troxclair.”

The Dem Chair says of Ellis:  “Paige is an advocate for Planned Parenthood and believes that Austin can be a leader in gun safety reform … and is running to ensure environmental responsibility.”  The Democratic Party is raising money for Ellis and is block-walking Sunday, November 25th to get out the vote for her.

If Ellis wins, there will be no conservative voice, much less a lone vote, on the Austin City Council.  And, as the Austin American-Statesman noted previously, in the very diverse 11-member City Council, there will be no white, heterosexual, Christian male serving on the lawmaking body.  Early voting runs from November 29th to December 7th. Read more →

November 16, 2018

Volume 40, Number 33

Dear [MM_Member_Data name=’firstName’],

What would a race for President of the United States be that didnt include a Texan or two in the mix?  Remember last time around, the Republican primary featured Ted Cruz and Rick Perry.  It also included Jeb Bush, who was born in Texas and is a family member of the famed twoBushpresidentsfromTexas.  Now its the Democrats turn.  Lets start with two Texas Democrats in the very early speculation Julian Castro and Beto ORourke.

Castro is the Texan frontrunner as we speak.  The former San Antonio mayor and former Housing and Urban Development Secretary is making the most overt moves to get the Democratic Party’s nomination for president, even saying he is “likely” to run.

What do we mean by “overt” moves?  Just last week Castro had a private meeting in the Alamo City with roughly 20 possible donors to fatten his presidential campaign war chest, as first reported by PoliticoHes also building a paid staff in the early nominating state of Iowa.  And, he’s talked to lawyers about “the mechanics of a possible 2020 presidential campaign.”

Just as important, he crisscrossed the country during the recentlyconcluded midterm elections campaigning for Democratic candidates.  This was a significant effort to build support, as his Opportunity First PAC endorsed (meaning, gave money) to 89 Democrats.  He’s visited early primary states like New Hampshire, South Carolina and Nevada, as well as Arizona and Florida.  He was an early (2017) endorser of Andrew Gillum’s Florida campaign for governor.

And, right now, he is the only Hispanic to privately make major presidential moves.  Not coincidentally, Castro is raising money and speaking in Hispanic-heavy California late this week.

Ironically, O’Rourke while not making anywhere near the national moves as Castro, is more top-of-the-mind with his fellow Democrats.  He is a media darling, as well as an inspiration for liberal Democrats – with many speculating about a presidential run for him.

The El Paso Congressmans term ends in January.  So he has a national platform – if he decides to use it – as Dem leaders urge him to seek the presidency. His mega-financed race against Cruz raised his profile.  Check the next item for stats about O’Rourke’s campaign. Read more →

November 9, 2018

Volume 40, Number 32

Austins reputation as a home for heavyweight companies of the future is wellrecognized and welldeserved.  After all, when you start calling the roll of Austin majors Dell, Google, Apple, Facebook, Indeed, 3M, etc., its hard to know where to stop.  The list is long and impressive.  But what about smaller enterprises that could be the biggies of the future?  Where does Austin stand as the site for startups?  New information late this week:  startups accounted for a larger share of businesses in Austin than in nearly all major US metros in 2016.

Young companies account for a larger share of businesses in Austin than in nearly all other major US metros.  So, it’s important to note that for the first time, the Survey of Business Owners compiled as part of USCensus Bureau data, included data regarding the number of years a firm has been in business.

Here’s how the numbers break out.  Take the newbies, those firms with less than 2 years in businessAustin with 4,444 companies, or 11.6% of all employer firms, ranks #3 in the nation, behind #1 Las Vegas and #2, Orlando.

Those Austin companies that have been in business a little longer, but less than four years, break out this way:  10,807 Austin businesses, or 28.1% of employer firms, place Austin at #2 in the nation, behind #1 Las Vegas.

And the oldies?  Austin firms in business less than six years15,077 Austin businesses, or 39.3% of firms, place Austin at #2 in the nation, behind #1 Las Vegas.

How did other major Texas metros fare in this review of the 50 largest metros in the US, in business less than 6 years?  The DallasFt. Worth metro was 5th in the nation, Houston was ranked #10 and the San Antonio metro was 13th in the US.

In the past, Austin has been noted as a good place to start a company.  After all, Dell started in a UTAustin dorm room.  But, this is the first report putting precise numbers to the entrepreneurial environment in this area.  This late report came to us from the Austin Chambers VP/Research Beverly Kerr.  Her analysis goes much deeper by the way.  For instance, she breaks it down by womenowned firms, minority and veteran entrepreneurs.  And she reports on Austin’s #4 US 2016 ranking for firms receiving significant funding from outside investors. Read more →

November 2, 2018

Volume 40, Number 31

This story has nothing to do with political campaigning.  (Youre being bombarded with enough of those stories prior to next weeks important election.)  Lets focus instead on some developments that will have significant economic benefits for the Austin area, in fact for the entire state of Texas.  The benefits are long range, but will take a long time to implement.

Business leaders and economists alike breathed a sigh of relief when the new three-nation trade deal was announced.  The USMexicoCanada Agreement (USMCA) replaces the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).  Get used to the new initials, because the agreement, once implemented, will be very important for the Austin, and Texas, economy.

The key words in the previous sentence were “once implemented,” because the process is long and arduous.  Its been a long time coming and will be a long time before it might go into effect.  And the implementation process could hit a few political stumbling blocks.  The agreement is still not officially signed.  The agreement will be signed November 30th, Mexican President Enrique Pena Nietos last day in office.

Now comes the hard part,” observes Austinite Jack Martin who is the global Chair/CEO of Hill+Knowlton Strategies.  Martin points out USMCA will not go into effect until it gets legislative approval in all three countries.  “No one expects this to be much of a problem in Canada or Mexico.  But early next year, USMCA will arrive before the US Congress, which is when the task at hand moves from private negotiations to public salesmanship.”

Winning over America will be the hard part,” Martin predicted, “as it was in passing NAFTA in the ’90s.  It was, safe to say, an uphill fight.  Back then, the key to passing NAFTA was getting enough support from Democrats.  The core of opposition was led by labor unions.”

Now, what?  “There could be a devil hiding in USMCAs details that we dont know about yet,” Martin noted.  And the process itself is complicated.  Both the USHouse and USSenate must ratify the Agreement and they can only vote up or downNo amendments are allowed.  Also Congress can only start consideration when the administration decides to send it to Congress.  And, Martin says “what is likely to happen is that the administration will submit the legislation when it has the votes to pass it.”  Take a deep breath and be patient. Read more →